Welcome to CISA

  • the only centre for Irish Studies in Denmark

Welcome to CISA

  • The only centre for Irish studies in Denmark

About

The Centre for Irish Studies in Aarhus is the only centre for Irish Studies in Denmark and one of two such centres in Scandinavia. The centre offers teaching in Irish history, society, literature and culture in compulsory courses and elective seminars on undergraduate and graduate level. The centre plays a key role within NISN, the Nordic Irish Studies Network, and publishes the peer-reviewed Nordic Irish Studies journal, in co-operation with DUCIS (see link) and NISN.

CISA has hosted three international conferences and a number of international seminars and symposia since its inauguration in 2000 and, as part of the Department of English at Aarhus University.

Our main objective is is to help advance the study of Ireland in Denmark by facilitating research and teaching in the fields of Irish history, culture, literature and politics as seen in a broad European and international context.

News

Events

CISA is happy to announce the spring seminar series 2017! The seminars will cover varied topics such as law, cinema, politics, memory studies, Greek tragedy and Northern Irish theater.

Ireland and the Politics of Memory

Wednesday, March 1st, 4.30 pm to 6 pm.

Nobelparken, building 1481 room 366.

The Centre for Irish Studies and the English Lecture Society are happy to announce that the first seminar in our CISA Spring Seminar Series 2017 will be taking place on the 1 of March at 16.30-18.00 at Nobelparken, building 1481 room 366.

The seminar series comprise a total of five double lectures all fuelled by snacks and followed by discussions.

‘Remembering the Easter Rising and the End of Empire’

Associate professor and director of the Centre for Irish Studies Sara Dybris McQuaid will open the series by exploring how and why last year’s centennial commemoration of the 1916 Easter Rising saw new transnational narratives emerge alongside the tried and tested national mythologies. The role of the Rising in inspiring other anti-colonial struggles around the British Empire has reverberated in a number of commemorative forms and products inspired by increased immigration to Ireland and the use of comparative anti-colonial struggles and the exchange of revolutionary ideas across nations has been especially prominent in the case of India.

Con. & Eva: revolutionary sisters’

Associate Professor in Sustainable Heritage Management Laura McAtackney will discuss the relationship between the two sisters Constance de Markievicz and Eva Gore-Booth. Constance Markievicz played a crucial part in the 1916 rising, an involvement for which she was sentenced to death but was subsequently pardoned. Both sisters were politically very active in their struggle for the rights of women, workers and for Irish Independence. Through a number of sources; some which are well known and others that have only been recently discovered Dr. Laura McAtackney will explore the lives of the two sisters and the relationship between them as well as its’ impact on their actions.

Remember to stay tuned for more information on the upcoming seminars in our series – the next of which will take place on 22 March and will include an exciting seminar on Irish cinema by Stephen Joyce along with a film screening. Information on the seminars will all be shared on the Centre for Irish Studies facebook page https://www.facebook.com/cisaau/ as well as on the ELS facebook page https://www.facebook.com/ELS.AarhusUni/?fref=ts.

 


The Northern Ireland Troubles in Britain

March 28th, at 10-11 in Nobelparken building 1481, room 264.

The Centre for Irish Studies and the English Lecture Society are happy to announce that the third seminar in our CISA Spring Seminar Series 2017 will be taking place on 28 March at 10-11 in Nobelparken building 1481, room 264.

Professor of historical cultural studies, Graham Dawson has graciously agreed to visit us from Brighton University to talk about his book ‘The Northern Ireland Troubles in Britain’.

The book is the first comprehensive study of the history and memory of the troubles in Britain. It explores how the British people, including the Irish communities within Britain has responded to and engaged with the conflict, within the context of contested narratives given by the state as well as its opponents. It also examines the role the conflict has played in the lives of individuals as well as upon communities, cultures and the political and social relationships in Britain. It makes a point for further research and public debate on the topic as it asserts that the ‘unfinished business’ of the past yet remains to be addressed in Britain. It underlines the need for acknowledging the legacy, understanding the history and engaging with memories in the context of peacebuilding and reconciliation.

The book contains contributions from a wide field of scholars within various disciplines (Social, political and cultural history; politics; media, film and cultural studies; law; literature; performing arts; sociology; peace studies); activists, artists, writers and peace-builders; and people with direct personal experience of the conflict.

 


Ireland and the EU

April 5th, at 4.30 pm to 6 pm, in Nobelparken building 1481, room 366.

The Centre for Irish Studies and the English Lecture Society are happy to announce that the fourth seminar in our CISA Spring Seminar Series 2017 will be taking place on the 5 of April at 16.30-18.00 at Nobelparken building 1481, room 366.

The seminar series comprise a total of five double lectures all fuelled by snacks and followed by discussions.

 In Brexit times, this double seminar will deal with Ireland and its relations to the EU. We will look at the EU as a peace-building project as well as the impact of British, Irish and Danish accession to the EU in the 1970s, through its impact on the Court of Justice’ case-law.


‘Brexit and Northern Ireland: New dynamics in old conflicts?’

Speaker: Sara Dybris McQuaid. Associate professor of British and Irish history and society and director of the Centre of Irish Studies.

The British referendum on EU Membership revealed a less than United Kingdom. The results demonstrated clear demographic divisions in terms of age, gender, education, class, city and country. Importantly, obvious divisions also emerged between the nations, which make up the United Kingdom.

While England and Wales voted to leave, a majority of voters in Scotland and Northern Ireland opted to stay. Brexit is now a powerful motor in the ongoing challenges to the future integrity of the United Kingdom posed by nationalist movements, particularly in Scotland and Northern Ireland. As such, the referendum about external relations with the EU is accelerating an internal crisis in the UK. Sara Dybris McQuaid will discuss the case of Northern Ireland and consider how (EEC) EU membership has contributed to the peace in Northern Ireland and how the result of the referendum will continue to affect the peace process and the future of Northern Ireland.

‘The Anglo-Danish-Irish Judicial Connection: Mackenzie Stuart, Sørensen, and Ó Dálaigh, and the early days at the Court of Justice of the European Communities

Speaker: Graham Butler, Assistant Professor of Law, Aarhus University

The United Kingdom, Denmark, and all joined the EU in 1973, and were entitled to nominate for appointment a judge to the Court of Justice of the European Communities. These judges would be in the position to bring their own legal culture and experience to the international court in Luxembourg. The UK nominated the Scotsman Alexander MacKenzie Stuart to be judge, alongside London-based Jean Pierre Warner as Advocate-General. Ireland nominated its Chief Justice, Cearbhall Ó Dálaigh to be judge, and Denmark put forth the Professor Max Sørensen of Aarhus University to also be judge.

Over the years that followed, the Court of Justice continued to be faced with questions on the correct interpretation of Community law when questions were asked of it, and it jostled with its constitutional doctrines that had emanated from the previous decades. What influence and impact did this enlargement of the Court have? By looking to the judgments of Court and the constitutional questions being put to it, we can begin to chart the effects of the judgments of that time on the theory and practice of European Union law today.

Remember to stay tuned for more information on the upcoming seminars in our series – the fifth and final of which will take place on 3 May and will include two seminars on ‘Irish Politics and public performance’ given by Isabelle Torrance and Isabel Kusche. Information on the seminars will all be shared on the Centre for Irish Studies Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/cisaau/ as well as on the ELS Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/ELS.AarhusUni/?fref=ts.


Irish politics and Public performance

May 10th, at 4.30 pm to 6 pm.

The Centre for Irish Studies and the English Lecture Society are happy to announce that the fourth seminar in our CISA Spring Seminar Series 2017 will be taking place on 3 May at 16.30-18.00 in Nobelparken Building 1481 room 366!

The seminar series comprise a total of five double lectures all fuelled by snacks and followed by discussions.

As the title of this double seminar suggests, this last seminar of the season will explore performative aspects of politics, in terms of the specific style of Irish politicians, as well as how political expression is presented in the Northern Irish theatre. 

Greek Tragedy and the Troubles

Speaker: Isabelle Torrance, AIAS.

At the intersection of theatre and political discourse, Isabelle Torrance’s research charts the way in which the theatre scene in Northern Ireland employs the models of the Greek tragedies. This seminar will explore how Greek tragic models have been adapted in Northern Irish theatre as a means of political expression, from the height of The Troubles in the 1980s until the 2013 Derry/Londonderry UK City of Culture

Non-programmatic politics in times of crisis: the case of Ireland

Speaker: Isabel Kusche, AIAS.

The strong constituency focus of Irish parliamentarians is a well-known feature of the Irish political system. Their non-programmatic, catch-all appeals to voters have time and again been the subject of critical commentaries. After much of the confidence about the achievements of the Celtic Tiger years, (the rapid economic growth beginning in the mid 90s) has been swept away by the financial crisis, the localist orientation of Irish politics is at a crossroads. On the one hand, it has been suggested to be a factor that contributed to the depth of the crisis. On the other hand, before the crisis hit it was regularly rewarded at the ballot box. This presentation will give an overview of the long-standing debate about this feature of Irish politics and discuss whether the recent crisis is likely to weaken or strengthen it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact

For news comments or information on conferences and publications, contact:

Sara Dybris McQuaid

Associate professorSchool of Communication and Culture - English

Related websites

  • NISN
    Nordic Irish Studies Network
  • DUCIS
    Dalarna University Centre For Irish Studies
  • EFACIS
    European Federation of Associations and Centres of Irish Studies
  • IASIL
    The International Association for the Study of Irish Literatures
  • Searc's Web Guide
    - to Irish Resources on the Internet